Classics on Call #1 “In the Penal Colony” by “Franz Kafka”


Classics on Call is TAB’s new undertaking. This time, we are digging deep, to the very core of literature. In Classics on Call, we will pick worthy classics(of all time) and we will discuss a little bit about them in this section. This section is open to all. Feel free to share your views in the comment section below. Also, if you have read a classic and want to share a word or two, you can mail us on theauthorsblogg@gmail.com. We will publish it on our blog for open debate. So be a host and pick a call of classic.

in the penal colony
Classics on call #1

 

Art defines the artist and the vice versa. If you have read The Metamorphosis you would be  aware of Franz Kafka, and if you know who Franz Kafka is, you must have read The Metamorphosis.  The Metamorphosis is Kafka’s most popular work, but alas, we will not discuss it here, as it is too deep to dig, and out of scope for this section. So I shall go with, probably Kafka’s third-most popular work (after The Metamorphosis and The Trial), ‘In the Penal Colony’.

If you have read The Metamorphosis you would be quite aware of Franz Kafka and if you know who Franz Kafka is, you would have read The Metamorphosis.

Kafka is known for his surreal and unreal literary works. Kafka’s work is so surreal and unreal that it’s actually real, as life in its brutal form is. *winks* That’s what happen when you read Kafka for a long time.

Kafka’s work is so surreal and unreal that it’s actually real, as life in its brutal form is.

Talking about ‘In the Penal Colony’, Kafka, through his character (the officer), explains the process of inscription on the body of a prisoner, IN DETAILS…in excruciating details. But it’s not just the process, it’s actually more than that. That’s exactly where I compare Kafka’s two major works, ‘The Metamorphosis’ and ‘In the Penal Colony’, the extraction from both the stories.  In Metamorphosis, you may perceive Kafka’s work as he was trying to tell you, but in  ‘In the Penal Colony’ there is just no certain analysis/perception. There are two endings to the story and four different analysis (that’s obviously for me). You may get more than that, or nothing, as you may perceive it as a violent piece of shit (excuse my language). In that case, I would suggest you to read the story again as you may see a flower blossoming out of it. Like I said surreal and unreal.

I will obviously neither tell you the ending nor my analysis as it would to hinder your reading experience. But I suggest that if you are willing to pick any classic writer in near future, Kafka should be on the top of that list.

And after reading him, if you feel philosophical, vivacious and despairing at the same time, congratulations you have been hit, you have been hit by Kafkaesque.

Happy reading!

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